Killing Patton: The Strange Death of World War II’s Most Audacious General by Bill O’Reilly

Patton

When I saw “Patton” at the theater in 1970, I never suspected anything malicious about the General’s death. I thought it was ironic that he had survived the front-line battlefields of two world wars unscathed, only to meet his fate in a freak accident. But over the years, having become better read regarding all the circumstances of the times and having learned more about the world in general, I’m now convinced that the death of Patton was no accident.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln – Doris Kearns Goodwin

Edward Bates, attorney general; William H. Seward, secretary of state; Edwin M. Stanton, secretary of war; Salmon P. Chase, Treasury secretary. Source: Mathew Brady/Corbis; Time Life Pictures/Getty Images; Mathew Brady/Hulton Archive/Getty Images; Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Edward Bates, attorney general; William H. Seward, secretary of state; Edwin M. Stanton, secretary of war; Salmon P. Chase, Treasury secretary.
Source: Mathew Brady/Corbis; Time Life Pictures/Getty Images; Mathew Brady/Hulton Archive/Getty Images; Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Like American icons and Founding Fathers Washington, Adams, Jefferson and Franklin are linked to the period of the American Revolutionary War, Lincoln is associated with the horrific growing pains experienced during the American Civil War, however, Lincoln’s feats extend far beyond the boundaries of our own nation, transcending to global proportions.

Continue reading

First Family – Abigail & John Adams by Joseph Ellis

My second Joseph Ellis, I’ve come to enjoy his ‘to the point’, ‘no frills’ style of writing. Though McCullough’s “John Adams”, which is cited by Ellis, provides a more in depth and detailed version of much of the same material, Ellis tells it in fewer words, which is not necessarily a bad thing.

Continue reading

Washington: A Life by Ron Chernow

The name George Washington is so deeply ingrained into American culture, that it would be easy to dismiss reading his biography as old hat and blase. Sometimes, however, it is good to go ahead and dive into a biography like that anyway – perhaps there is new insight to be gained into an old, familiar character.

Continue reading

The Bully Pulpit – Doris Kearns Goodwin

Not only a biographical account of two of our greatest presidents during times of tremendous change, this work by 1995 Pulitzer Prize for History recipient, Doris Kearns Goodwin, details the birth and impact of investigative (muckraking) reporting on society in describing Sam MClure’s magazine staff consisting of Ida Tarbell, John Phillips, Ray Stannard Baker, Lincoln Steffens and William Allen White during the “Golden Age of Journalism”.

Continue reading

PATRICK HENRY, Patriot & Statesman – Norine Dickson Campbell

“Give me liberty or give me death!

When the name Patrick Henry is mentioned, practically anyone will think of the prolific quote that is so deeply identified with the spirit of the American Revolution, however, after reading this work by Norine Dickson Campbell, it’s clear that Patrick Henry should be credited with far, far more.

Continue reading